LISTS OF COOL

Going by the calendar: It’s not quite summer yet. Going by the weather: Which way to the beach?! I must get there stat! Either way you look at it, the season of sun, sand and good times is upon us! Enjoying the hot weather goes hand in hand with also enjoying the relief of a darn good AC. If you’re looking to beat the heat this summer, get inside a frosty, cool movie theater and check out No Film School’s 17 indie films that are total must-sees over the next few months. From horror films like IT COMES AT NIGHT to highly anticipated romcoms like THE BIG SICK, there’s pretty much a cinematic sun escape for everyone this year!

So, you checked out the newly announced Indie Street Film Festival program and event line-up this week and you basically cannot wait another day until you can catch some of the best in indie cinema to hit the festival circuit this year. While you patiently await the upcoming second edition of ISFF, hitting Red Bank, NJ this July, why not bide time by perusing and getting acquainted with some other indie films coming out this year. Check out Indiewire's list of 20 films that they believe will define this year in indie cinema!

With the 2017 Sundance Film Festival only a handful of days away, so begins another new year of festival programs to look out for, anticipating what independent films to catch and what to miss. Sundance starts the ball rolling and Rotterdam, Berlin, SXSW, Cannes, Toronto and a smattering of other big name festivals follow hot on the heels over the next few months, introducing a window of programming that continues the cycle. Filmmaker Magazine’s Dan Schoenbrun made a list of 50 anticipated American films that have not yet premiered anywhere but will nonetheless be in festival programs everywhere soon. They are simply films he has heard of and cannot wait to see. Check out the full list, including explanations as to why Shoenbrun anticipates their release!

Awards Season. Ah, a time when big Hollywood-budgeted films and just a small handful of indie underdogs are presented acclaim on the world stage. But why not get onboard with awards that simply appreciate the creativity and innovation on display in small/practically no budget indie films? This is what NoBudge.com celebrated this week with their 2016 NoBudge Awards. Featuring ISFF Narrative Short Jury Winner “Thunder Road” as well as recent Indie Street favorites, like “Killer” and “World Wide Woven Bodies”, the list of award-winners showcases exactly how much entertainment and talent low budget shorts and the like can offer to the world. Check out the full list of winners here!

Pop the champagne! Grab those noise makers! Get lost in a sea of balloons, confetti and kissing couples. It’s a New Year! 2016 was one heck of a ride - a true rollercoaster that threw us for loop after loop. However, you can’t deny at least one exhilarating high that the big bad ol' 2-0-1-6 presented to us: the magic of cinema. The past year can definitely brag about that one bright spot, as we’ve seen an onslaught of breathtaking shorts and features presented both online and in cinemas and festivals around the world. Before we start all over again in a fresh, new year, the Indie Street and Indie Street Film Festival staff would like to present our favorite films from ISFF 2016 and beyond! From our inaugural year favorites to other indie hits and theatrical releases, we thank you 2016 for allowing us to throw one heck of a new festival and for showcasing some beautiful, smart and thought-provoking films. Let’s hit the corner of Indie Street and Memory Lane before looking ahead to what the new year has to offer!

 

 

 

 

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Romeo is Bleeding, dir. by Jason Zeldes

Documentary Feature (ISFF 2016 Selection)

 

Short Synopsis: Donte Clark's poetic voice was honed on the violent street corners of a struggling city. Yet rather than succumb to the pressures of Richmond, CA, Clark uses his artistic perspective to help save his city from itself.

 

 

Why we love it: It’s important to remember that, throughout history, one person can ignite change. Romeo is Bleeding, which won the Jury Award for Best Documentary at ISFF 2016, is a must-see doc if you’re looking for an inspirational, beautifully shot raw human story that seems more relevant than ever.

 

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The Lobster, dir. by Yorgos Lanthimos

Narrative Feature 

 

Short Synopsis: In a dystopian near future, single people, according to the laws of The City, are taken to The Hotel, where they are obliged to find a romantic partner in forty-five days or are transformed into beasts and sent off into The Woods.

 

 

Why we love it: A kind of macabre black comedy, here unfolds a story about single loners that must find a partner before their time runs out and they are forced to be turned into an animal of their choice. This dark and twisted film is a love story unlike any we've ever seen. A Cannes Jury Prize Winner, this peculiar festival pleaser and critic favorite should peak interest in both lovers of the unusual and ones simply interested in the intricacies of human connections. 

  

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Thunder Road, dir. by Jim Cummings

Narrative Short (ISFF 2016 Selection)

 

Short Synopsis: Officer Arnaud loved his Mom.

 

 

Why we love it: The Boss should be honored...Jim Cummings gives this classic song new depths of humor and humanity. A one take film with a million dynamics, get ready for a short film that will have you go from crying tears of laughter to suddenly crying tears of sorrow. The 2016 Indie Street Film Festival Jury Prize Winner for best Narrative Short, if you’ve not seen this incredible ode to loss, what are you waiting for?!

  

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The Boatman, dir. by Zack Godshall

Documentary Short (ISFF 2016 Selection)

 

Short Synopsis: As Joseph and Selina Gonzales approach their 71st wedding anniversary, they reflect on endurance, love and fortitude after years of living outside the flood walls in Yscloskey Beach, Louisiana.

 

 

Why we love it: Sometimes all it takes is the jarring grit of reality to form a story that will linger long within both your mind and your heart. A portrait of love, perseverance and endurance throughout hardship, The Boatman is an Indie Street Film Festival short doc selection well worth your time. Have the tissues ready - this one is quite the beautifully human tearjerker.

  

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The Past Inside The Present, dir. by James Siewert

Animated Short (ISFF 2016 Selection)

 

Short Synopsis: An allegorical tale of a couple who attempt to renew their dying relationship by plugging directly into recordings of their memories.  Available for download on Bit Torrent Now.

 

 

Why we love it: No dialogue and no words to describe this genius hand-crafted animation. Showcasing the mad, twisted rotoscoped world of a couple reliving and renewing moments from their relationship, this jaw-dropping and intricately created film will have you in awe of both its depiction of our relation to time as well as its layers of art and storytelling.

  

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Moonlight, dir. by Barry Jenkins

Narrative Feature

 

Short Synopsis: A young man deals with his dysfunctional home life and comes of age in Miami during the "War on Drugs" era.

 

 

Why we love it: Well, first of all, who doesn’t love it?! Moonlight has taken the indie community and beyond by storm. A haunting portrait of African-American identity and repression, here masculinity, desire, and sexuality are all explored in a tender, emotional way. This is a film well worth the acclaim it's finding with audiences and critics alike.

 

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Sonita, dir. by Rokhsareh Ghaem Maghami

Documentary Feature (ISFF 2016 Special Screening)

 

Short Synopsis: A young Afghani refugee in Iran channels her frustrations and seizes her destiny through music after her family tries to sell her into a marriage.

 

 

Why we love it: Should a filmmaker get involved with their subject even if it means a new chance at life? Winner of the 2016 Sundance Film Festival's Grand Jury Prize for Best World Cinema Documentary, Sonita goes beyond the story of a young girl following her dream to be a rapper and becomes a must-see film about politics, culture and fighting against obstacles in order to find opportunity and identity outside of expectations.

  

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Hunt for the Wilderpeople, dir. by Taika Waititi

Narrative Feature

 

Short Synopsis: A boy and his “uncle” become the subjects of a manhunt after they get stranded in the New Zealand wilderness.

 

 

Why we love it: A misfit adventure between an unwanted, troublemaker orphan and a misunderstood foster uncle through the wilderness of New Zealand? Count us in! The wit and acting alone within this hilarious offering from writer/director Taika Waititi should put this film on your must-see list. Add in the million other positives on display within this unique production and we think it should definitely jump to the top of your list!

 

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Whale Valley, dir. by Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson

Narrative Short

 

Short Synopsis: Two brothers live in a remote fjord with their parents. We look into their world through the eyes of the younger brother and follow them on a journey that marks a turning point in both of their lives.

 

 

 

Why we love it: A haunting portrait of two brothers, their deep bond & the feeling of isolation that comes from living within an overpowering, remote landscape, we don't think there has been a more beautiful, cinematic short film released this year. This Cannes Special Mention Winner is a film that goes beyond words, best enjoyed in feeling and trust. An absolute must-see!

 

 

2016. A year of horrors. And yet, a year of great cinema! Indiewire seems to have found the perfect way to merge 2016’s two different personalities into one list. Check out their list of the top 10 horror films of 2016 that you probably didn't get a chance to see. A great collection of under the radar, overlooked films sure to bring a bit of the right kind of fright into your life. So, put the Christmas movies aside for one night, bundle up by the fireplace and get ready for a holiday scare!

It's that time of the year again! 'End of year' lists and 'best ofs' are saturating the internet. Sure, some are a little subjective and sometimes we don't agree. Yet, it's fun to compare and contrast what other fellow indie film lovers are liking and hating after a bit of a rough year. One list that you should definitely check out is the one created by the curatorial team over at Vimeo. While it may not float your boat 100%, Vimeo definitely has their pulse on what makes up the best of the best. Do yourself a favor and expand your tastes in 2017 by seeing some of the best 2016 had to offer over on Vimeo's blog!

As the oft-complicated and questionable year of 2016 starts to wrap itself up, we begin to reflect back on some of the highs and lows of what the past 12 months had to offer. Though this year offered quite its fair share of lows, its independent film offerings were truly some wonders to behold. And it’s not just about the narratives on-screen, the acting or everything production-wise in between. This year, indies were also celebrated because of their marketing prowess and movie posters. From recent gem “Moonlight” to 1960s throwback sexploitation film “The Love Witch”, check out IndieWire’s gallery of their top 10 favorite indie film posters of the year!

This week, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences not only announced the top 10 live-action shorts moving forward in their voting process for the 89th Academy Awards. They also narrowed down the qualifying animated shorts to a top 10. The final nominees in both categories will be named on January 24th. Congrats to all of the filmmakers!  The full list of potential animated nominees:  Blind Vaysha, dir by. Theodore Usher Borrowed Time, dir by. Andrew Coats and Lou Hamou Lhadj Happy End, dir. by Jan Saska The Head Vanishes, dir. by Franck Dion Inner Workings, dir. by Leo Matsuda Once upon a Line, dir. by Alicia Jasina Pear Cider and Cigarettes, dir. by Robert Valley Pearl, dir. by Patrick Osborne Piper, dir. by Alan Barillaro Sous Tes Doigts (Under Your Fingers), dir. by Marie-Christine Courtès

On Wednesday, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced the top 10 live-action shorts moving forward in their voting process for the 89th Academy Awards. Narrowed down from the qualifying 137 films, the final nominees from this top 10 shortlist will be named on January 24th. We are beyond thrilled to see that director Marc Fouchard made the list! His short film, “The Way of Tea” screened at the 2016 Indie Street Film Festival this summer and was a true audience favorite. Congrats to Marc and all of the other filmmakers!  The full list of potential nominees:  “Bon Voyage,” dir. by Marc Wilkins “Ennemis Intérieurs,” dir. by Sélim Azzazi “Graffiti,” dir. by Lluis Quilez “La Femme et le TGV,” dir. by Timo von Gunten“Nocturne in Black,” dir. by Jimmy Keyrouz “The Rifle, the Jackal, the Wolf and the Boy,” dir. by Oualid Mouaness “Silent Nights,” dir. by Aske Bang “Sing (Mindenki),” dir. by Kristof Deák “Timecode,” dir. by Juanjo Giménez “The Way of Tea (Les Frémissements du Thé),” dir. by Marc Fouchard

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