NO FILM SCHOOL

So, you fancy yourself an artist, eh? A real tortured soul? Fighting against a world that just doesn’t understand you or your special brand of creativity? Whether that’s you to a T or not at all, the classic idea of the pessimistic, unhappy artist is definitely a stereotype we’ve all come to know. And Simon Cade of DSLRguide has created a video titled "Why Artists Are Never Happy" that shows this may not be such a bad cliché to fit into as a creator. Cade's suggestion? That the unhappiness and discontentment that come from failing to capture a certain artistic vision is the actual spark that ignites an artist's creativity. Watch the video below and then check out No Film School’s breakdown of Cade's logic. Now, go ask yourself, how can YOU fight against the pressures of perfectionism and make your work even better? 

Going by the calendar: It’s not quite summer yet. Going by the weather: Which way to the beach?! I must get there stat! Either way you look at it, the season of sun, sand and good times is upon us! Enjoying the hot weather goes hand in hand with also enjoying the relief of a darn good AC. If you’re looking to beat the heat this summer, get inside a frosty, cool movie theater and check out No Film School’s 17 indie films that are total must-sees over the next few months. From horror films like IT COMES AT NIGHT to highly anticipated romcoms like THE BIG SICK, there’s pretty much a cinematic sun escape for everyone this year!

So you’ve made a film. Congrats! Now you need to get some eyes on it...pronto. Knowing how to identify and find an audience for your creation is one of the most important steps in a distribution campaign. No Film School & Christopher Rufo see the importance in finding a passionate audience and break down how to do it in 5 simple steps. From focusing on finding the smallest group possible (ironically, a great idea!) to creating mailing lists, check out how to maximize your film’s exposure by heading over to No Film School now!

Drone. Aerial Footage. One take. One man’s total mental and emotional breakdown on film. Sound enticing? You better believe this suburban neighborhood drama is as good as it sounds. Imagined by the consistently impressive director Paul Trillo, this latest Vimeo Staff Pick, “At the End of the Cul-de-Sac”, is a mind-blowing feat of production work. Meticulous pre-production planning and overcoming daunting post-production challenges didn’t keep Trillo from delivering a one take drone shot short of epic proportions. Head to No Film School to read up on an interview with the director and to get an idea of the amount of work that goes into pulling off an entire short film as one continuous drone shot. And stay tuned for our mini-review of the short film later this week!

Filmmaker Parker Smith had never made a feature film before his debut “Ramblin’ Freak” played at SXSW a few weeks ago. And while the concept of first time filmmakers playing at top festivals is certainly not unheard of, try screening at SXSW with a feature documentary you made entirely on your own. A film school drop out with a remarkable vision, Parker Smith sat down with No Film School during the festival to offer up advice to new filmmakers on how to make a movie…entirely on your own. Watch the trailer for “Ramblin’ Freak”, Smith’s doc about seeking out legendary bodybuilder Gregg Valentino, below and then head over to No Film School to take a listen to his exclusive interview

Dying to adapt your pretty stellar short film into a feature? Are your friends tired of hearing you constantly talk about it? Think maybe it’s time to do something about all those dreams of yours? Lauren Wolkstein and Christopher Radcliff, directors of SXSW stand-out “The Strange Ones”, did just that. They adapted their short film of the same name into a successful feature that just screened at SXSW. Rumors are that it’s kinda darn good. Want to get insight on how to adapt YOUR short into a future award-winning feature? Read Wolkstein and Radcliff’s interview with No Film School and start getting inspired!

Yesterday, a new president. Today, a women’s march. What a time to then be in the snowy depths of Sundance Film Festival, where passionate people are celebrating a medium of storytelling. Think of all of the discussions that the independent film communities are currently having regarding their roles in the future - how they can become an even more driven, powerful force in delivering the messages we need. In light of the nationwide (heck, even worldwide) marches happening today, No Film School asked 5 female filmmakers with films at Sundance this year where they see the future of indie film. The result? Five totally different perspectives. This a total must read, so check out the full article via No Film School now!

Since last year (and specifically in this case, last year’s Sundance Film Festival), virtual reality has exploded. 2016 really was the year that the technology was truly pushed on the consumer level and filmmakers/artists started experimenting with the possibilities even more. But could 2017 be the year of an audience breakthrough for VR? And could it happen at the Sundance Film Festival this upcoming week? Senior Programmer and Chief Curator of Sundance’s New Frontier, Shari Frilot, sat down with No Film School and gave them a sneak peak into some of the highlights from this year’s New Frontier VR program. From a VR palace, narrative and documentary experiences to even augmented reality, this year’s festival is poised to be an exciting one for the new technology. Check out the highlights over at No Film School!

“Maria’s Pick” may have taken the month off but that doesn’t mean the music should stop on Indie Street! As we near the end of 2016, why not revisit some of Maria’s best picks from the year, including Jamie XX’s “Gosh”, directed by Romain Gavras, Makeunder’s “Great Headless Blank”, directed by Carine Khalife, and last month’s “Unreceived”, directed by Jordan Bruner, with music by Nelly Kate. While you’re in the musical mood, why not check out No Film School’s list of the top 8 music videos from 2016 - ones that blur the line between music and filmmaking. Get introduced to new artists/filmmakers ready to take over the scene in 2017 as well as familiar legends still busting out top quality work!

Virtual reality. It’s here. It’s prominent. It’s already playing a role in the way we look at creating within the medium of the moving image in the immediate future, so why not embrace it? That’s what filmmakers James Spinney and Peter Middleton did with their award-winning feature film and virtual reality experience, “Notes on Blindness”. The story follows the life of British theologian John Hull, a man who kept extensive audio diaries chronicling the emotional, mental and psychological experience of becoming blind. As the filmmakers explored Hull’s detailed collection, they found a vast goldmine that offered so much material that their creation couldn’t be confined to just one medium. The result? A film that plays as half documentary/half narrative. When virtual reality became an option, the missing bit of the full experience was complete. It become whole. Without the film component or without the VR component, the emotional pull of the story wouldn't be the same. It’s cinema. It’s the experience. It’s all about transcending what we know and discovering something beyond. Read more about the award-winning experience via No Film School!

Pages